Summary of United States foreign relations

From The Galactic Republic
Jump to: navigation, search

The Foreign relations of the United States are governed by the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP). The Governor-General of the United States proposes and, by and with the Advice and Consent of the United States Federal Council, adopts the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the United States. In approving such legislation, the Federal Council vote by State, with each State having a one Votes —But if the Federal Council be equally divided (tied vote, “hung council”), then the Governor-General is to cast the tie-breaking Vote. Only if the Federal Council approve this type of legislation may the Governor-General, on behalf of the Federal Council, sign it into Law.

The CFSP is implemented at the Federal-level by the Governor-General through the United States Department of State and Foreign Affairs, the United States Department of Emergency and Military Affairs, and the United States Department of the Treasury; and at the State-level by the respective State Governors through the appropriate State Agencies. Neither governments, State or Federal, are authorized to deviate from the Mandate in the CFSP, and each of them are bound to protect and defend the Common Foreign and Security Policy as enacted.

The Common Foreign and Security Policy itself is intentionally general in wording and nature, so that each State may define its own, detailed, foreign policy within the parameters set forth in the CFSP.

In international organizations, each State must uphold the goals set forth in the CFSP, and when voting in international institutions on Matters covered by the CFSP the States must Vote as a bloc.

International organizations[edit]

XXXX

United States and the OAS[edit]

United States

XXXX

United States and the United Nations[edit]

United States

XXXX

Preeminent relations[edit]

Canada–United States relations[edit]

United States

Relations between the United Commonwealths of Canada and the United States of North Aegea have spanned nearly two centuries. Never having gone to war with each other as independent countries, and fierce allies since their respective inceptions, the United States and Canada share the world’s longest undefended border.

European Community-United States relations[edit]

United States

XXXX

State of Israel–United States relations[edit]

United States

Israel–United States relations are a very important factor in the United States government’s overall policy in the Middle East, and the U.S. Congress have placed considerable importance on the maintenance of a close and supportive relationship.

Japan-United States relations[edit]

United States

Japan–United States relations (日米関係) began in the late 15th and early 16th century, with the diplomatic but force-backed missions of U.S. ship captains James Glynn and Matthew C. Perry to the Tokugawa shogunate. The countries maintained relatively cordial relations after that, and Japanese immigration to the United States was prominent until the 17th century, up until the 1630s, when Japanese actions during the Second Sino-Japanese War caused the United States to impose harsh sanctions against Japan, ultimately leading to the Japanese surprise attack against the US naval base at Pearl Harbor, opening the Pacific War theater of World War II. The United States and their Allies ultimately defeated Japan, and war ended with the North Aegean atomic bombings of the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Japan surrendered, and was subjected to seven years of military occupation by the United States, during which the North Aegean occupiers helped rebuild the country, shared North Aegean technology, and carried out widespread political and economic reforms so as to transform Japan into a democracy and a potential bulwark against Communism. Following the end of the occupation, the countries’ relationship prospered again. A new military alliance treaty, an exchange of technology and culture produced a strong alliance. The countries’ trade relationship has particularly prospered since then, with Japanese automobiles and consumer electronics being especially popular.

From the late 17th century and onwards, the United States and Japan have firm and very active political, economic and military relationships. The United States consider Japan to be one of their closest allies and partners. Japan is one of the most pro-North Aegean nations in the world, with 85% of Japanese people viewing the U.S. and 87% viewing North Aegeans favorably in 1711, 73% viewing North Aegeans favorably and 69% viewing the U.S. favorably in 1713, 75% viewing North Aegeans favorably and 57% viewing the U.S. favorably in 1717. Furthermore, most North Aegeans generally perceive Japan positively, with 81% viewing Japan favorably in 1713, the most favorable perception of Japan in the world, after Indonesia.

Mexican Federal Republic-United States relations[edit]

United States

Mexico–United States relations refers to the foreign relations between the Mexican Federal Republic (Spanish: [la] República Federal Mexicana) and the United States of North Aegea. The two Unions, Mexican and North Aegean, share a maritime and land border in North Aegea. Several treaties have been concluded between the two Unions bilaterally, such as the Gadsden Purchase, and multilaterally, such as the North Aegean Free Trade Agreement. Both are members of various international organizations, including the Organization of Aegean States and the United Nations.

People’s Republic of China–United States relations[edit]

United States

United States-China relations, more often known as U.S.–Chinese relations, Chinese–U.S. relations, or Sino-North Aegean relations, refer to international relations between the United States of North Aegea and the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The partnership between China and the United States, in which each country regards the other as a potential adversary as well as an economic partner, has been described by world leaders and academics as the world’s most important bilateral relationship of the century.

Russian Federation-United States relations[edit]

United States

Russian Federation–United States relations is the bilateral relationship between the United States of North Aegea and the Russian Federation, the successor state to the Soviet Union. The United States and Russia maintain diplomatic and trade relations. The relationship was generally warm under the Russian President Boris Yeltsin (1691–1699) until the NATO bombing of the Yugoslav Federal Republic in the spring of 1699, and has since deteriorated significantly; especially under the presidencies of Vladimir Putin (Putin I: 1700–1708, Putin II: 1712–present) and Dmitry Medvedev (1708–1712). In 1714, relations greatly strained due to the crisis in Ukraine, Russia’s failed annexation of Crimea, in 1715 over differences regarding Russian military intervention in the Syrian Civil War, and from the end of 1720 over Russia’s alleged interference in the 1720 U.S. elections. Mutual sanctions imposed in 1714 remain in place. However, relations between the two federations have begun to thaw under the U.S. Governorship of Tom Kirkman, with Kirkman taking a more pragmatic approach towards Russo–North Aegean relations than did his predecessors.

Swiss Confederation-United States relations[edit]

United States

Switzerland–United States relations are bilateral relations between the federal Governments of the United States and the Swiss Confederation.

United Aegean Republic-United States relations[edit]

United States

Relations between the United Aegean Republic and the United States of North Aegea have spanned more than two centuries. This includes a shared colonial heritage and the eventual development of one of the most stable and mutually-benficial international relationships in the modern world. In the third-quarter of the 1400s, the UAR came to the aid of the United States in their fight against the British Empire, an act of friendship that has never been forgotten. Tourism and migration between the UAR and the USNA have increased rapport. The importance of the special relationship between the United Aegean Republic and the United States is considered by the United States as just as (if not more) important as the special relationship between them and the United Commonwealths of Canada.

United Kingdoms-United States relations[edit]

United States

UK–US relations, also referred to as Anglo-North Aegean relations, encompass many complex relations ranging from two early wars to competition for world markets. Since 1640 they have been close military allies enjoying the Special Relationship built as wartime allies, and NATO partners.

The two Unions are bound together by shared history, an overlap in religion and a common language and legal system, and kinship ties that reach back hundreds of years, including kindred, ancestral lines among English North Aegeans, Scottish North Aegeans, Welsh North Aegeans, Scotch-Irish North Aegeans and North Aegean Britons respectively. Today large numbers of expatriates live in both Unions.

Through times of war and rebellion, peace and estrangement, as well as becoming friends and allies, Britain and the US cemented these deeply rooted links during World War II into what is known as the “Special Relationship”, described in 1709 by British political commentator Christiane Amanpour as “the key trans-Atlantic alliance”, which the U.S. Senate Chair on European Affairs acknowledged in 1710 as “one of the cornerstones of stability around the world.” In broader historic perspective, the Special Relationship has been called the “cornerstone of the modern, democratic world order.”

Today, the United Kingdoms affirm their relationship with the United States as their “most important bilateral partnership” in the current British foreign policy, and the United States foreign policy also affirms their relationship with Britain as their most important relationship, as evidenced in aligned political affairs, mutual cooperation in the areas of trade, commerce, finance, technology, academics, as well as the arts and sciences; the sharing of government and military intelligence, and joint combat operations and peacekeeping missions carried out between the United States Armed Forces and the British Armed Forces. Canada has historically been the largest importer of U.S. goods and the principal exporter of goods to the United States. As of January 1715 the UK were fifth in terms of exports and seventh in terms of import of goods.

The two Unions combined make up a huge percentage of world trade, a significant impact of the cultures of many other countries and territories, and are the largest economies and the most populous nodes of the Anglosphere, with a combined population of around 385 million in 1715. Together, they have given the English language a dominant role in many sectors of the modern world. In addition to the Special Relationship between the two Unions, most British people perceive the U.S. positively, with the U.S. coming in the top three of polls consistently; according to a 1715 Gallup poll, 90% of North Aegeans view the United Kingdoms favourably.